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April 2014
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And so it begins…

The 2014 trapping season is about to begin with a huge bang — we have just received word of a large farm colony that already has kittens. We need to start work on that immediately.

In order to do that we need our traps back! We have many traps out in the community, lent out over the last year or two to people with cats in need of trapping. Now we need to round them all up, very quickly, so we can start on this colony ASAP.

If you have one or more of our traps, or if you know someone who does, could you give us a call to let us know or simply drop the trap(s) off at Duncan Pets? We reall y need to get on this quickly and we really need our traps back to do it.

Call 250-743-6500, please.

Cat in Drop Trap

Daisy!

Here is Daisy, our latest winter kitten to be ready for adoption. She is still a bit shy but we think with a loving home she will be a wonderful addition to someone’s life! In the words of her foster mom:

Daisy

I am not entirely sure how old she is but I am thinking 4-5 months. Daisy is a litterbox trained young spayed female beauty. She is all white with a small dash of pale yellow on her tail. Daisy would require a calm, quiet indoor adoption placement as she is still easily frightened and will still try to run and hide if startled. She is very sweet and affectionate and loves her pats and will come right up to eat treats out of your hand. She has a very quiet (to almost silent) meow and purr and is very playful. Other cats would be fine with her as would a fairly quiet dog.

Some special kittens

PUMPKIN HAS BEEN ADOPTED!  

PANSY: Pansy is a very pretty but very timid spayed female kitten. She is litter box trained. Pansy is easily frightened and often tries to run and hide. She requires an understanding, calm and quiet, indoor adoption placement, where she will be able to feel secure and be allowed to continue to develop trust. She was trapped with several siblings at the beginning of Nov. 2013, from a feral litter thought to have been born late Aug or early Sept 2013. She will now sometimes come out for food treats, and although not seeking it -she will now also tolerate some handling and she will purr when held gently but securely. She does not seem to play very much with her siblings –holding back, she often sits by herself and quietly observes the antics of the others.

GRUMPY: Grumpy is an attractive, litter box trained, young spayed female tabby, who would benefit from an understanding caring calm adoptive placement. Estimated to have been born sometime either at the end of Aug. or early Sept., Grumpy was trapped on a farming property with several siblings at the end of Oct. 2013. Grumpy stubbornly clings to her feral origins, and goes to “flight” whenever startled or pressured, and if unable to readily escape –she will “fight”. This means she will hiss and bite or scratch if startled, approached too quickly or grabbed. She can be won over with patience (a calm and slow approach) and treats of canned food. When held securely by her rehabilitative caregiver, she will now tolerate petting and will often even purr; however, she continues to hiss when she is first picked up. She would suit a quiet, one or two person home, where she could live in a secure indoor environment.

These . . . → Read More: Some special kittens

Foster Care Needed

RAFFERTY

BALLOU

 

 

We have had a request for help for two senior graduates of the Cowichan Cat Rescue adoption program and we are hoping we can find a saint to rescue this lady. She will be out of the country from February 10th through May 8th. She had made arrangements for a house and pet sitter but was informed two days ago that the person would not be arriving as planned. She is in desperate need of a foster home, preferably indoor only, for Rafferty and Ballou. All items for their care will be provided and arrangements made for vet care to be covered if necessary, although the cats are healthy and problems are not expected. Here in her own words: “They are both seniors (and Cowichan Cat Resue kittens all grown up!)…of 11 and 10 years old. Rafferty is 11 – he’s the ginger boy and Ballou is 10. They are pretty laid back, very, very affectionate and mainly indoor. They do go out for a bit in the evening but don’t like the cold. Ballou loves his catnip and the picture on the right is him after engaging in a wee bit of the ‘nip. They snuggle and sleep…with meals in between:-) They come with all their food (dry and wet) and litter. I am leaving the Island on the morning of Feb. 10th and come back the evening of May 8th. I am hoping someone can help with this sudden and unexpected turn of events.” If you can help please contact CCR by email or Facebook message.

 

Wrapping up the trapping

We have finished trapping yet another small colony of cats – very clever ones! – in downtown Duncan after 3 months of effort. A young calico, who took weeks to make an appearance, was the first catch. A very lazy but intelligent black male was the second. The third cat, a champagne-coloured tabby, plus her then two week old litter of kittens hidden somewhere in the neighbourhood, were the final frontier. The cats were kindly being fed behind Fabrications clothing shop so that they would be trained to eat at a designated spot in preparation for trapping. It worked for the first catch. The black tom was not as cooperative, but eventually went under a drop trap set up in an adjoining vacant lot while the trapper hid in a car, holding the pull string through a crack in the window. It was anticipated that the last cat, Champagne Mama, as we called her, would bring her kittens to the feeding station behind the shop when they were 4-5 weeks old and ready to wean. This didn’t happen. By talking to people in the immediate area about the cat and her hidden litter, we learned that Champagne Mama was returning again and again to the shallow, lengthy crawlspace underneath a building serving as the site office of the Kenneth Park construction project. Weninger Construction was instrumental in the rescue effort from then on. They left dishes of food and water for the cat family every weekday, and stayed on the lookout for any emerging kittens. They were helpful and hospitable to our volunteers. One of our volunteers left food for the cats every Saturday and Sunday. For weeks. It was now winter and very cold. No kitten had even been glimpsed yet. One very positive sign was that . . . → Read More: Wrapping up the trapping

Here’s your chance!

It turns out that Champagne Mama has two kittens and we caught them both today. This is one of them. I suppose you could call her a calico but that sounds misleading. She is pewter grey with flecks of champagne colour, and no white. She weighs 2 lb 15 oz and is about 11 weeks old. I have clipped her nails, given her a bath, and given her a dose of Revolution to take care of fleas and any worms she’s carrying. I will get her spayed on Tuesday. She appears perfectly healthy. At… her age and size she is a project kitten. She is not violent, but won’t tame down in a matter of a few days like tiny kittens do. It would take time – 2 months, I’m guessing – to turn her into a perfectly socialized little cat, if she’s amenable to your efforts. It has to be home where there isn’t already a litter of wildish kittens, because this girl needs to bond to humans now not other skittish cats. You would have to commit to trying until March, and if at that point she’s still not tame enough, then we can look for a barn home for her. If she tames easily, then great, she can go to the pet store for adoption as soon as that happens. All our foster homes are full, pretty much, and the foster carers have had a long year, so I understand that this is not an easy sell, but I wanted to put the option out there. If there aren’t any takers, that’s fine, she will become one of our feral fosters, well kept in a large wire kennel in a nice lady’s workshop with her mom and possibly her sister until we can barn them out. . . . → Read More: Here’s your chance!

Year end reminder

Counting down to New Year’s! Just a reminder that donations made by the end of the year will get you a tax receipt to apply to your 2013 taxes.

Donate on line or send a cheque to the mailing address — P.O. Box 677, Duncan, BC V9L 3Y1

Merry Christmas!

 

There is nothing quite like getting some help with the last minute wrapping!

From all of us at Cowichan Cat Rescue, human and feline, very best wishes for a Merry Christmas and a very Happy New Year.

Winter Shelters

Having a safe dry place out of the wind can be the difference between survival and death for a feral cat in the winter. Shelters can be lovely expensive custom buildings or they can be recycled coolers filled with straw, and almost everything in between. For some great ideas for winter shelters, check out the Alley Cat allies shelter pages.

http://www.alleycat.org/ShelterGallery

 

December Newsletter

Year End in Review

It has been another incredibly busy year for the crew at Cowichan Cat Rescue. Once again we have spayed and neutered almost 500 feral cats and kittens — and that is without having had funding for the 100 or so domestic cats we had previously been doing annually under the Low Cost Program.This looks like another record setting year.

What a strange year it has been! Despite the fact that it is December, we are still bringing in kittens for our adoption program and stiill fixing adult ferals. Our foster homes are still full, and this has never happened in the 15 years we have been in existence! We blame the late summer for the late kittens. We credit some wonderful volunteers who are providing heated indoor recovery space for the fact that we are able to continue to work with the adult ferals in the middle of winter.We credit amazing foster homes for the fact that we have places to put those poor sickly winter kittens so they can recover from their very bad start in life and eventually find their way into new homes.

Once again we are ending the year knowing that there are a few more colonies that have reached 100% fixed status. One colony that had produced about 100 kittens in 2012 finally entered our program this year. We took approximately 80 kittens from that colony in the Spring — getting totally swamped in the process! — but only had one more litter from that colony in the summer. That last mother was fixed and as far as we can tell every kitten has been taken from the colony and every adult has been fixed. That is our definition of success! High fives all around!

Another large colony is down . . . → Read More: December Newsletter